sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
http://velamag.com/superbabies-dont-cry/

SuperBabies Don't Cry
by Heather Kirn Lanier

"With my woo-woo belief that the mind could control the body, I’d pushed disability away. I’d done this by subscribing to the belief that disability always had an avoidable cause. I’d believed I could control the body because I could not stomach the truth: that the body is fragile, ephemeral. I had not realized this about myself. I had not realized this about my parents. I did not see our adamant devotion to vitamins and affirmations and organics as fear-based, as an attempt to control the uncontrollable. I also did not see it as political. I saw it as morally good. I was making a SuperHuman. What was wrong with that?"

Content Notes: Pregnancy, Birth, Parenting, Internalized Ableism

some links

Feb. 20th, 2015 11:22 am
sasha_feather: white woman in space suit (Astronaut)
A friend of mine had an article published in the Atlantic, exploring the "watchmaker" metaphor used by some people interested in intelligent design. A Failed Metaphor for Intelligent Design by Adam Shapiro. This information-packed article explores how the metaphor suited the British society from which it arose.

A really thoughtful, wonderful article by a woman who chose to have a double mastectomy (vs. a single). Contains some partially-nude photographs. shirts off, underwear on: play out, breast cancer and gender expectations by Melanie Testa.

Doing Science Sitting Down, and other thoughts about Universal Design by [twitter.com profile] jacquelyngill.

Tortoise

Jan. 6th, 2015 10:01 pm
sasha_feather: dog looking over a valley (dog and landscape)
What's Wrong with Me? by Meghan O'Rouke, in the New Yorker, 2013. A fantastic personal essay on having an autoimmune disease.

Lately I feel like while my peers and friends are making progress with their lives, I am barely maintaining mine. It's hard not to compare myself to other people and find myself coming up short. I'm permanently poor, my career is going nowhere, I'm chronically single, and I have no energy, etc.

It's comforting to be around animals, who are better at living in the moment. I'm meditating upon the tortoise, a cool animal that takes its time.

When I was about 18 or so, an adult friend of mine from 4-H and I were discussing shyness, and how she used to be shy. Her advice was, "give yourself ten years." It was good advice.

Give yourself time. Be the tortoise.
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
I said something tonight which seemed to surprise my friends, and now I feel the need to talk about it a little, so I'm laying it out here: I don't believe in the "obesity epidemic." I mean that I really don't believe it exists.

My essential reading for this is a 2005/2006 scientific article:

The epidemiology of overweight and obesity: public health crisis or moral panic? Paul Campos, et al. International Journal of Epidemiology.

Selections follow, but I suggest reading it all. It is scientfic, but readable, and a fantastic article that states the claims the claims the medical/scientific communities have been making, and swiftly knocks them down. For example:

Claim #2: ‘Mortality rates increase with increasing degrees of overweight, as measured by BMI.’—WHO, 2003 (p. 61)2

This claim, central to arguments that higher than average body mass amount to a major public health problem, is at best weakly supported by the epidemiological literature. Except at true statistical extremes, high body mass is a very weak predictor of mortality, and may even be protective in older populations.



Claim #4: Significant long-term weight loss is a practical goal, and will improve health.

At present, this claim is almost completely unsupported by the epidemiological literature. It is a remarkable fact that the central premise of the current war on fat—that turning obese and overweight people into so-called ‘normal weight’ individuals will improve their health—remains an untested hypothesis. One main reason the hypothesis remains untested is because there is no method available to produce the result that would have to be produced—significant long-term weight loss, in statistically significant cohorts—in order to test the claim.


...

The authors also speculate on social and political factors contributing to this moral panic:

In particular, organizations like the International Obesity Task Force (which has authored many of the WHO reports on obesity) and the American Obesity Association (which has actively campaigned to have obesity officially designated as a ‘disease’) have been largely funded by pharmaceutical and weight-loss companies.

Moral panics are typical during times of rapid social change and involve an exaggeration or fabrication of risks, the use of disaster analogies, and the projection of societal anxieties onto a stigmatized group.47,48

Public opinion studies also show that negative attitudes towards the obese are highly correlated with negative attitudes towards minorities and the poor, such as the belief that all these groups are lazy and lack self-control and will power. This suggests that anxieties about racial integration and immigration may be an underlying cause of some of the concern over obesity.49–51

Previous work indicates that moral panics often displace broader anxieties about changing gender roles.49,53 While this hypothesis deserves further research, a recent advertisement that ran in a major American newspaper suggests that this may be at play in the obesity panic. This advertisement blames ‘30 years of feminist careerism’ for an epidemic of childhood obesity and diabetes: ‘With most mothers working, too few adults and children eat balanced, nutritious, portion-controlled home-cooked meals.

However, other works suggest that some portion of the population's weight gain can be attributed to smoking cessation,56 which runs counter to the assumption that the country's weight gain is evidence of both moral laxity and a harbinger of declining overall health.
[bolding mine]

Articles

Jul. 8th, 2013 11:39 am
sasha_feather: "subversive" in rainbow colors (subversive)
1. Dustin Hoffman gets choked up over Tootsie. Interview from 2012, clip at the Mary Sue.

"I have been brainwashed."

2. I enjoyed this NY Times Magazine piece about a man who reinvented himself after getting fired from two famous rock bands:

A Rock and Roll Casualty Who Became a War Hero
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
The Science of Racism: Radiolab's Treatment of Hmong Experience
Submitted by Kao Kalia Yang on October 22, 2012 - 10:17pm

Link: http://hyphenmagazine.com/blog/archive/2012/10/science-racism-radiolabs-treatment-hmong-experience

Full text under the cut, since the link is not working for some folks (assumed high server load)
Content notices: Racism. Discussion of miscarriage.

Read more... )

Some Recs!

Jun. 9th, 2012 11:07 am
sasha_feather: Black, white, and red image of woman with futuristic helmet (Sci Fi Woman)
1. Twings has a new Avengers story and it is GREAT!

[personal profile] thingswithwings: Stark, A.E., and Banner, R. Bruce. (2013). "Biodosimetric Tools for Measuring Induced Isomeric Transition in Inverted Paired States." International Journal of Radiation Biology 89.9, 43-85.

Tony Stark/Bruce Banner/(The Hulk)

What I especially love about this story is this might be a spoiler )

2. What it means to be well read and how SF helped me stop caring about it

This blog post made me cheer in agreement. YES.

3. All the stuff lately at [community profile] vidrecs has been great, but this one especially:

Terminator Salvation: A Perfect Lie by meivocis.

I watched this movie because I love the Terminator franchise, and I did like most of the movie, but the ending ruined it. The poster at vidrecs says another ending was originally proposed for the movie, and the vid seems to reinforce that:

on endings )
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
I was interviewed for this great article by s.e. smith at xojane.com:

Where are all the disabled scientists?

Loved this

Mar. 7th, 2012 03:41 pm
sasha_feather: Leela from the 5th element (multipass)
It's from 2008

Men Explain Things To Me by Rebecca Solnit
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
Trying to Explain a Drop in Infant Mortality
By Erik Eckholm

Full article with pictures and links at NY Times

MADISON, Wis. — Seven and a half months into Ta-Shai Pendleton’s first pregnancy, her child was stillborn. Then in early 2008, she bore a daughter prematurely.

Soon after, Ms. Pendleton moved from a community in Racine that was thick with poverty to a better neighborhood in Madison. Here, for the first time, she had a full-term pregnancy.

As she cradled her 2-month-old daughter recently, she described the fear and isolation she had experienced during her first two pregnancies, and the more embracing help she found 100 miles away with her third. In Madison, county nurses made frequent home visits, and she got more help from her new church.

The lives and pregnancies of black mothers like Ms. Pendleton, 21, are now the subject of intense study as researchers confront one of the country’s most intractable health problems: the large racial gap in infant deaths, primarily due to a higher incidence among blacks of very premature births.
Read more... )

Profile

sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
sasha_feather

July 2017

S M T W T F S
      1
234 5 678
91011 12131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031     

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 23rd, 2017 02:39 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios