sasha_feather: Black, white, and red image of woman with futuristic helmet (Sci Fi Woman)
Occasionally I wonder if maybe I *am* the language police! Maybe I *am* too sensitive and it's not my job to tell other people how to talk or write, etc.

A few things reassure me.

One, lots of other people pay just as close attention to language and its political uses as I do, and some of these people blog about it. Some people blog about things I've never thought about, so maybe the things I notice are worth writing about.

For example:
Dave Hingsburger: Non-traditional doesn't mean unimportant.

The term I use, I insist that others use when they are speaking with me about someone they support is: non-traditional communicator. (As opposed to "non-verbal".)

Lydia Brown: Why the term 'psychopath' is racist and ableist. (Note: this post contains some upsetting language.)

Antisocial Personality Disorder, the diagnostic category that comes closest to approximating the lay definition of psychopathy, is most often a tool for criminalizing poverty, blackness and brownness, and disability. It is the diagnostic label that legitimizes non-compliance as a mental health problem.

---

Two, I find language and its uses fascinating. I will think about it anyway, so I might as well write about it.

Three, there are some phrases I use that make sense to me because not only do they seem like more accurate metaphors, they make the world a little kinder to live in.

For instance, when we speak of "lowering barriers" or obstacles, that seems kinder and easier than "overcoming obstacles". Lowering barriers is a group effort, a structural accomplishment that is done by many and benefits many. It agrees with the idea of the social model of disability. Overcoming obstacles might take teamwork, but it tends to focus on one person's drive, ambition, and success, and falls in line with the "supercrip" stereotype.

The same is true of interdependence vs. independence.

Language is subtle and it influences the way we think about ourselves and our world.
sasha_feather: Black, white, and red image of woman with futuristic helmet (Sci Fi Woman)
What Disability-related Programming would you like to see at WisCon this year?

I am happy to submit program ideas if you all can help me come up with some!

Some thoughts to get you started:

Interdependency and work sharing

Hierarchies within communities and how we disrupt them-- (ie, am I disabled or queer enough?), getting rid of the gates!

Political coalitions. Groups of disabled folks are naturally coalitions since our disabilities differ.
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
Today I read an obituary which said, despite the person's chronic disease, "he rarely missed a day of work."

As someone who has often called in sick, I'm always bothered by this common phrase; it praises people who put work before health. Not just their own health, but the health of others: coming to work while having a communicable illness puts others at risk too.

This phrase serves to enforce our place in a capitalist, production-oriented society, where work is the most important thing, and health and rest are distant followers. Workers are granted sick days, but to take them is some sort of indulgence rather than a necessary part of being a human being with a body. We also forget that sick days are something that unions have fought for.

Because I'm always sick to some degree, I often struggle with deciding whether I am sick "enough" to call in, sick "enough" to stay home and rest. Typically I will feel guilty if I call in sick, even though my body demands rest. Having a chronic illness means that I need much more rest than the average person, and something like a migraine or cold will add to my need for rest. Language valorizing people who don't call in, ever, doesn't help to alleviate my guilt.

As I saw someone say on twitter: self care is a radical political act.
sasha_feather: cartoon charachter who has Syndrome (i have syndrome)
Source: purpleviolin91 on Tumblr
link to image

100: Fully recovered. Normal activity levels with no symptoms.
90: Normal activity levels with mild symptoms at times.
80: Near normal activity with some symptoms.
70: Able to work full time but with difficult. Mostly mild symptoms.
60: Able to do about 6-7 hours of work a day. Mostly mild to moderate symptoms.
50: Able to do about 4-5 hours a day of work or similar activity at home. Daily rests required. Moderate symptoms on average.
40: Able to leave house every day. Moderate symptoms on average. Able to do about 3-4 hours a day of work or activity like housework, shopping, using computer.
30: Able to leave house several times a week. Moderate to severe symptoms much of the time.
20: Able to leave house once or twice a week. Moderate to severe symptoms. Able to concentrate for 1 hour or less each day. Able to do about 2 hours of work at home, or activity like housework, shopping, using computer.
10: Mostly bedridden. Severe symptoms.
0: Bedridden constantly. Unable to care for self.


Notes from Tumblr:
dogunderwater:

fantasticallyfibro:

mynameiskleio:

rainbowrosepetals:

purpleviolin91:

the best pain scale ive ever seen for chronic pain #Repost from @jennjenn129 with @repostapp #chronicpain #rsd #crps
Helpful activity scale both for talking to practitioners and gauging your own progress.
I’m 30!!!!
Fuck. I thought I was doing better but yeah I’m at a 40. I I’m out much longer I get a migraine or otherwise ill most times :/
This is like… too real. How am I supposed to bullshit myself now??

(end notes)

The note about being no longer able to bullshit oneself is particularly apt. I run about a 40 or 50 on this scale.

Respiration

Aug. 3rd, 2013 03:08 pm
sasha_feather: cartoon charachter who has Syndrome (i have syndrome)
I had an asthma dream: I was visiting nicely with a couple of fandom friends on some sort of joint trip somewhere. But then I decided to go for a walk. I walked too far, and had to hurry back to catch a train. I had to walk up hill, in the heat, carrying a very heavy back pack full of text books. I stopped for cold water and tried to use Euro bills in a vending machine. Everything was very much a physical struggle.

With chronic illness there is a lot of "Why?" that goes unanswered. Going to doctors, getting tests, trying treatments, is in some ways an attempt to answer that question, "Why am I ill? Did I eat something I'm allergic to? Is it air pollution? Is it that cigarette smoke from the other night? Is it pollen?" Occasionally some answers may present themselves, but some answers never will: "Why me?" for example. Or, why does illness and suffering exist at all?

One of my favorite Jesse the K quotes is "pain has no meaning". It does not represent past life guilt, it is not meant to build character, and searching for one's pain triggers only benefits a person up to a point. After that, there are diminishing returns: you obsess over your pain and get no new information.

So, having chronic illness involves a lot of acceptance work. And it is work, of an emotional sort. I find that I must work on accepting, over and over, that I am ill and that I must rest.

Some motherly types on Facebook encouraged me to go to urgent care after I posted seeking asthma advice. I went this morning, got nebulized, and got an increase in my prednisone prescription.
sasha_feather: white woman in space suit (Astronaut)
1. Sometime in June I decided to put plastic sheeting and duct tape over the open car window of my neighbor's car. It rained a lot in June, and it bothered me every time I parked my car, seeing this nice car with its window down, the owners nowhere to be seen, and rain coming in. I also put some plastic lids with baking soda on them inside the car to try and reduce the smell.

Today my neighbors returned from their long vacation in Europe. They thanked me warmly for taking care of their car, saying they don't know what happened with the window. They gave me a box of Belgian chocolates. The man had talked with me before about Minnesota-- I am from MN, and he'd lived in the Twin Cities while getting his degree. So when I said, "No problem, it seemed like the neighborly thing to do," he said, "Maybe the Minnesotan thing to do."

2. I went to a Disability Pride Madison festival. It was cold, but fun. I met a few folks.

3. I gave away some spider plants by setting them on the curb.
sasha_feather: Simon Pegg from Hot Fuzz holding a gun looking tough (hot fuzz)
I hope you all know by now that language and its effects are an issue near and dear to my heart. Language can be hostile or welcoming, centering or othering. This is particularly on my mind as I look at various "accessibility" policies for conventions in the SF/F world.

I am creating List of such conventions for the Geek Feminism Wiki. (This was inspired by their List of cons with anti-harassment policies.)

First, why is it helpful to have such policies online?

Because information is good access. The more information you can provide to people, even if it's to say that there are barriers to access, the better people can plan for their trip.
Secondly, if people have to ask to receive information, that in itself is a barrier. As many of us with anxiety, fatigue, or other disabilities know, it can be difficult to make that phone call or send that email. A lot of us are used to dealing with people on the other end of the line who aren't our allies and might make our lives more difficult when we ask for information.

As and someone working access, do you really want to give out the information again and again? Why not just do it once, and then point people at your webpage or printed materials?

I know there are some conventions that have had good access but don't have their policies online. Open Source Bridge, I'm looking at you. :)

Other conventions have their policies online (good!) but then make all kinds of mistakes with language. They send signals that they really don't want PWDs to attend at all, that they think people are faking disabilities in order to get good seats or other services (no one does this! seriously), and otherwise hostile language.

Several of these pages use the term "special needs". I don't think very many people on this planet have special needs. Most people have the same needs, it's just that some of us need accommodation in order to enjoy the same events at conventions, like getting to the programming rooms in a timely manner, being able to move through the hotel, being able to understand what is going on, being able to visit with friends, etc. I realize special needs is an introduced PC term for disabled people, but I am just not sure that it fits or is accurate. It makes it sound like disabled people want "more" (like champagne) when what we really want is the same stuff as everyone else (water in a glass we can hold).

Whenever you want to say or write "special needs", I suggest you substitute "accommodations" instead.

Let's Break down some of the specific policies and why they are problematic:

DragonCon

"We will have the Con schedule in large print available (to be read at our table or we can email a copy to you to print or download to your screen reading device)

If you have low vision, you better have a device for reading the program. Otherwise, you have to sit at the registration table to read the program! It's apparently too hard for them to print off a few more copies for low-vision attendees. (Remember, this is a for-profit con.) I really don't know why you would want people clustered around your reg desk that way.



We offer 5 stickers for badges, based on needs:

Wheelchair seating: for our wheeled folk, of course.
Chair in Line/End of Row: for non-wheeled folks with mobility impairments.
Proximity/ 50 ft. to Screen: for visual/lip reading access.
Sightlines: for access to the interpreter, safe space for working animals, and certain other unique situations.
Medical: This sticker is merely a place to put emergency information if you have a medical condition that the EMT needs to know about before they put you in the ambulance. It does not entitle you to any other services.


A person has to out themselves in order to get any of these services. It's right there on one's badge: everyone you interact with at the convention then knows you are a disabled person. It also positions whoever gives the sticker as an authority. I know a lot of people with mild hearing loss who don't consider themselves disabled, but who might benefit from line-of-sight seating. Such people wouldn't want to get a sticker even if they might use an otherwise reserved chair.


One important thing to remember: we will do our best to make sure events are accessible to you, but that does not mean we guarantee you a front row seat, or head-of-the-line privileges. If you are going to a very popular event, you must get there extra early to get a good seat, just like everyone else. The accessible seating will not be in the front row.


I guess if you move slowly, are delayed by crowded elevators, etc., you are screwed. Several other websites said this. Maybe these conventions should put a cap on their membership? (Oh wait, DragonCon is for profit.)

Phoenix Comic Con This is the worst one.

You get a special badge! Lucky you.

But the badge doesn't get you:

· Early access to panels and special events
· Guaranteed access into special events, photo ops, autographs, or panels.
· The ability to skip lines

So fuck you I guess! Especially if you are someone who can't stand for a long time!

Service Animals are always welcome at the Phoenix Convention Center. Animals are sometimes questioned if the need is not apparent, so we suggest attendees carry documentation with them for their companion.

Does anyone know if this is actually illegal? It sounds illegal to me. [eta: it is, see comments] Then again, it's Arizona... I don't think "welcome" means what they think it means, also, to be pedantic, you won't get very far questioning an animal!

Some of the other policies are much better, including for ReaderCon, FogCon, and Arisia (and WisCon, but no need to toot my own horn--plus, I always want to improve.) Some suggested bits of activism for those involved with conventions, or even those who aren't but who can do emailing:
*Encourage Conferences and Conventions to develop Access policies and list them online. Professional and Academic conferences, trade shows, etc can be included here.
*Encourage those with bad policies to improve them.

Comments and suggestions welcome.
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
A couple notes I wanted to make while reading Far From the Tree.

p. 17: "Much of the debate around sexual-orientation laws has turned on the idea of that if you choose homosexuality, it should not be protected, but you are born with it, perhaps it should. Members of minority religions are protected not because they are born that way and can't do anything about it, but because we affirm their right to discover, declare, and inhabit the faith with which they identify. [...] This cripple-like model of homosexuality is depressing, but as soon as ayone posits that homosexuality is chosen or mutable, lawmakers and religious leaders try to cure and disenfranchise the gay people in their purview..."

I have blogged about this before here, so it was nice to see him cover it. It's particularly nice to see the way he frames it: the defensive position is held only because of attacks by lawmakers and the religious right.

p. 5: "We often use illness to disparage a way of being, and identity to validate that same way of being. This is a false dichotomy." [Here he talks about the wave-particle dual nature of light.] "A similar duality obtains in this matter of self. Many conditions are both illness and identity, but we can see one only when we obscure the other. Identity politics refutes the idea of illness, while medicine shortchanges identity. Both are diminished by this narrowness."

It is important to remember that models are incomplete ways of describing the world. Models are developed because we are unable to fully understand the world; it is simply too complex.

Models are sometimes in opposition with each other but not always: Most disabled people use medicines and support certain charities but also rely on the social model of disability to help us understand our place in the world and world for a better standard of life.
sasha_feather: Leela from the 5th element (multipass)
[personal profile] futuransky: Radical queer agenda panel notes/transcript

Me in access-fandom: Masked vs. Blind

---

I have been watching "Call the Midwife", which is a really lovely show. S1 is on Netflix; Season 2 is streaming on pbs.org. However: episode 2x04 is a Very Special Disability episode, about a baby born with spina bifida. I did try to keep an open mind here, but this ep need content notices for: Discussion of euthanasia of disabled babies, forced institutionalization of disabled babies and children, and lots of processing of abled people concerned PWD, including how difficult their lives will be, etc. There is also a character with anxiety, although I liked and related to her arc. The episode does actually end OK.
sasha_feather: Amelie, white woman with dark hair, smiling cheerfully (Amelie)
I really liked this post by s.e. smith: In Defence of the Urban Car.

I am good at guilting myself about things. The "shoulds" can take the voice of a parent, or the voice of liberal politics, or just a general sense that I should be doing more things during the day. As a person with lots of pain and fatigue, I generally need to rest a lot and I often have low productivity. It also helps me to drive my car rather than walk or ride the bus. The bus makes me feel motion sick and sometimes anxious. Walking leaves me tired out.

Last spring and summer I would walk to the neighborhood dog park (about 4 blocks) quite regularly. Then in mid-summer my knee swelled up. I started driving to the neighboring town's dog park, about 4 miles away. For some reason, in my mind there were two choices: walk to the nearby dog park or drive to the further one.

Then at some point it occurred to me that I could *drive* to the nearby dog park, saving my knee, saving gas and time, etc. I could walk longer at the park because I wouldn't have to walk back up the hill to get home. It seemed a little ridiculous to get in the car to drive the short distance to the park, but on the other hand, it helped me a lot. So now, that is what I do. This decision was about giving myself permission to make my life easier, as a disabled person.

Having a diagnosis of RA did help with this act of "giving myself permission." Social support from others also helps. Sometimes people at the DP (dog park) ask if I live in the neighborhood, etc, and I will say in a self-deprecating way, "Oh yes, I should probably walk here, but it just makes it easier to drive, what with my knee," etc. And nice comments from friends and acquaintances in support do help. There is a nice parking lot there and plenty of other people drive.

Other places this applies in my life: Doing just one load of laundry instead of all of the laundry. Using the clothes dryer instead of hanging clothes on the line (except that the driers don't work very well!) Doing a few dishes instead of all the dishes. Breaking tasks up into small bits over time. Some tips on UnF*ck Your Habitat have helped because that site emphasizes small, manageable tasks, with built-in breaks: 20/10s are 20 minutes of cleaning then a 10 minute break. Also they recommend concentrating on a particular area of cleaning, one that you really notice when you are finished.
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
Winter Nomads
French? with English subtitles. Seen at WI film festival. (I had a free ticket.)

I loved this film about shepherds who wander the countryside for 4 months to let the herd graze on leftover grass over the winter. It's a "fly on the wall" documentary with no explanations given. Pascal, a man perhaps in his fifties, travels with Carole, a young woman. They have 3 donkeys, four border collies, and about 800 sheep. They travel in beautiful countryside and through towns. They sleep on tarps and skins and eat food over a fire. It's an old way of life in a modern time. It was gorgeous and interesting.

The Sessions

This was a pretty solid movie about Mark O'Brien, a writer with post-polio syndrome, who hires a sex therapist. This film had a great cast and used a lot of Mark's words. It showed some of the realities of his life, was funny and as far as I could tell, realistic.

You can read his orginal essay in the Sun here.

What I disliked about the movie was its uncritical heteronormativity. That is to say; PIV intercourse was presented as being very important, even necessary!, to sex. Kink was not discussed. Adaptive devices weren't discussed in any real way.

Still I recommend this movie because there aren't that many films about disability and sex. And the cast is quite good.
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
Leigh Ann Hildebrand: I explain radical hospitality to my classmates by referencing the experience of arriving at a table where all the seats are already taken. Even if you've been invited to the meeting/dinner/event, if you arrive and there is no place to sit, there's a momentary experience of not-belonging. That feeling happens *before* people get a chance to offer a chair or move down or make room, and if there are additional factors like being already marginalized, being the only POC, the only woman, the only PWD -- that first impression can cast a long shadow on the organization. So I tell people, "Always have an empty chair. And if someone arrives to fill it, get ANOTHER empty chair. Make sure that there is always room at your table -- literally and metaphorically -- for the unexpected guest as well as the expected ones."
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
Fastening One Heart to Every Falling Thing (51519 words) by thefourthvine
Chapters: 1/1
Fandom: Hockey RPF
Rating: Explicit
Warnings: No Archive Warnings Apply
Relationships: Sidney Crosby/Evgeni Malkin, Evgeni Malkin/Alexander Ovechkin
Additional Tags: Alternate Universe, Alternate Universe - Soulbond, Trope Subversion/Inversion, Spacetoaster
Summary:

Geno can't. Sidney won't.



This isn't my fandom and I know nothing about hockey. That said, I loved this story a lot. It's a great tale about neuro-diversity, and a wonderful subversion of the soul bonding trope.

The world of the fic is one where everyone is psychic to a degree, and everyone soul bonds with their mate. People are warned as teens to be careful about soul bonding too early through touch and sex. Geno is born without the ability to soul bond, thus is able to have casual sex. He's seen as a resource for this purpose; but this of course also leaves him lonely.

Sidney is born super-psychic and isn't taught to control his abilities. He is sensitive, doesn't like to touch, and adamantly does not want to soul bond, despite the nearly universal expectation that he should.

Sidney is told explicitly that he's not broken, but in fact he's significantly impaired by his abilities and must make accommodations daily. He resists therapy, and indeed his therapist is annoying, but therapy is ultimately what he needs. Geno is told that he is broken, but to my eye his problem is all social stigma: people assume that he can't have a partner, and therefore doesn't want one. He's internalized the stigma to a certain degree.

These two men play hockey on the same team and end up being really good for each other.

This fic is really brilliant and I highly recommend it!
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
“Another myth that is firmly upheld is that disabled people are dependent and non-disabled people are independent. No one is actually independent. This is a myth perpetuated by disablism and driven by capitalism - we are all actually interdependent. Chances are, disabled or not, you don’t grow all of your food. Chances are, you didn’t build the car, bike, wheelchair, subway, shoes, or bus that transports you. Chances are you didn’t construct your home. Chances are you didn’t sew your clothing (or make the fabric and thread used to sew it). The difference between the needs that many disabled people have and the needs of people who are not labelled as disabled is that non-disabled people have had their dependencies normalized. The world has been built to accommodate certain needs and call the people who need those things independent, while other needs are considered exceptional. Each of us relies on others every day. We all rely on one another for support, resources, and to meet our needs. We are all interdependent. This interdependence is not weakness; rather, it is a part of our humanity.”
— AJ Withers Disability Politics and Theory p109 (via some_stars via dandyfied on Tumblr)
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
3 Links I found really interesting!

James Sheldon: Intelligence as a Compliment, Stupid as an Insult: Rethinking Normal, Rethinking Attraction, Rethinking Society.

The question, though, that I have for geeks is … can you give up your need to have been right, the self-righteousness that comes with putting down those who were putting you down all those years for being geeky? And what are the consequences that come with attempting to judge others’ intelligence. Many people process information differently or have different perceptions than you do. And there’s a long history in our society of those people being marginalized and oppressed for being that way.

Ta-Nehisi Coates at the Atlantic: Through the Lens of Disability

But here is what I think: so much social justice writing is about what society owes those who we perceive as getting the short of end of the stick. It's called social justice for a reason. But what I like about this post is that it isn't simply about what the world should do about physical disability, but how a physical disability shaped a person's life, regardless of societal responsibility.

Tim Chevalier at Geek Feminism: Being a Better Ally to Trans People

Sometimes claims that trans people are “unnatural” are really claims that trans people are some sort of modern creation of medical technology, as if we didn’t exist before medical interventions that sometimes make our lives easier existed.
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
I really appreciate that [livejournal.com profile] hc_bingo has changed its prompts to reflect events rather than identity categories (for instance "loss of vision" rather than "blindness").

Thanks, mods.
sasha_feather: rocks arranged in a pattern (pretty rocks)
One cool thing I learned from disability activism (and [personal profile] jesse_the_k) is the idea of scarcity vs. abundance. This helps me make sense of my daily life.

For instance, when I go to get groceries I often bring my own bags. The store gives 5 cents credit for each bag and it's better for the planet, etc. The problem is, the cashiers seem to shift from an abundance mentality (limitless plastic bags) to a scarcity mentality (only 3 bags that I brought). And even though I say to them, use plastic for whatever doesn't fit, they seem to take pride in saying, "Oh, I think I can make it all fit into your bags!" So then they load up my tote bags and make them super heavy and difficult to carry. I haven't yet figured out a solution to this, except bringing a huge amount of bags with my every time (even though I'm not sure how much I will buy), or teaching/training the baggers little by little not to over load my bags. This store is not designed in a way that would let me bag the groceries myself. I'm sure I look able bodied to them, like someone who would have no trouble lifting really heavy bags.

In terms of disability, abundance does us much better than scarcity: let's believe that there can be enough elevators, enough pain medication, enough time to get where we need to go (and to rest), enough access to medical care, enough support from our friends and loved ones. More than enough.

I believe in abundance.
sasha_feather: white woman hugging textual man (books)
I am reading a series of books about Alvin Ho by Lenore Look. These are kids' chapter books for young grade school kids and they are GREAT. Delightfully illustrated by Leuyen Pham, they are funny, charming books about Alvin, his family, friends and adventures. There are 4 books so far, called things like "Alivn Ho: Allergic to Girls, School, and other Scary Things."

I picked them up from the library because I saw them on a list of books about disability. Alvin is "scared of everything" and he can't talk in school (he has selective mutism). The books take this problem seriously without heaping pity on him, indeed they find the humor in the situation. They are from Alvin's perspective, and he talks about his everyday challenges trying to make friends at school, getting into trouble with his siblings, etc. He has a PDK (personal disaster kit) made from an old tackle box and filled with band-aid, a compass, and hand-written instructions for surviving difficult situations. He has a good family including his dog and grandparents. (See the glossary in the back for definitions of gunggung, etc.) Alvin is American-born Chinese and his culture is also part of the story.

I have been recommending these books to everyone! They are super great! So far these are the first books I've read with a character who has selective mutism and they exceed my expectations.

Many steps

Sep. 3rd, 2012 12:47 pm
sasha_feather: Max from Dark Angel (Max from Dark Angel)
One of the reasons it can be hard to Get Things Done is because we don't always realize how many steps are involved in a task. For instance, on my to-do list for a while has been: get photos framed for art show.

This is what the task really breaks down to:

1. Contact art show person (done by email)
2. Select photos (done)
3. Print photos at Walgreens (done)
3.5 Ask neighbor how he gets his photos framed (done)
4. Go to craft store and get frames with wiring on back (done yesterday)
5. Carry frames in from car (I haaate carrying things in from the car)
6. Frame photos
7. Contact art show person again to see where/when to drop them off, inquire about how to price them, etc.
8. Transport them (carefully) to the library for the show.

Today I broke one of the 4 frames while it was in the car, so I will either simply submit 3 photos instead of 4 (easier), or I will go back to the craft store for another frame. While running errands yesterday I also apparently left a different package at a store because I was hungry/tired. I am undecided about whether to go back for it-- it was just some postcards.

I don't really remember what things were like before I was disabled by illness, but I know things weren't this hard to accomplish. It's good to have several days off in a row right now.
sasha_feather: Leela from the 5th element (multipass)
Someone today directed me to "My Gimpy Life" on YouTube. It is GREAT and very funny! There are three episodes so far.

you tube clips under cut )

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